Expectations & Moving to Country

What are your expectations for moving to the country? Often what we see as an 

What are your expectations for moving to the country? Often what we see as an advantage or disadvantage can be two sides to the same coin.

For example when moving to a small town many like the “everyone knows everyone” but dislike the “nosy people” – especially when you’re not in the “in” crowd. Being different may be passed off in some crowds but not so much in others.

Many also find they purchase five acres to have a “homestead” growing their own food and find as a subdivision there are restrictions against having chickens or pigs – even a dozen chickens for eggs or raising a couple of pigs in the barn for freezer meat. Many real estate folks show these places that “accept livestock” (the exclusions are in the small print) and only when called on it admit chickens or pigs aren’t allowed. This can happen even on ag zoned land.

Many also find the image of ‘simplicity’ is a great deal of work maintaining a garden, flock of poultry, small and large livestock, handling or arranging butchering, predators and a host of other aspects that they weren’t aware of.

Have realistic expectations when planning a move to a rural area. Don’t assume that neighbors who farm will be willing to work for you for free. If they bring their tractor to till your garden offer a reasonable payment for their time and fuel. If they turn it down at least plan on sharing the harvest with them with occasional breads and other treats.

An example is a retired farmer who allows someone to hunt on his farm for occasional maintenance help of a few hours here or there. The hunter appreciates it and brings an occasional venison roast or other ‘benefit’ as a thank you. Although it isn’t expected it is a tasty incentive that has made a workable situation into a friendship.

Research, common sense and a reasonable expectation based on reality goes a long ways towards making a difference in a positive way for your lifestyle rather than disappointment.

advantage or disadvantage can be two sides to the same coin. For example when moving to a small town many like the “everyone knows everyone” but dislike the “nosy people” – especially when you’re not in the “in” crowd. Being different may be passed off in some crowds but not so much in others.

Many also find they purchase five acres to have a “homestead” growing their own food and find as a subdivision there are restrictions against having chickens or pigs – even a dozen chickens for eggs or raising a couple of pigs in the barn for freezer meat. Many real estate folks show these places that “accept livestock” (the exclusions are in the small print) and only when called on it admit chickens or pigs aren’t allowed. This can happen even on ag zoned land. Many also find the image of ‘simplicity’ is a great deal of work maintaining a garden, flock of poultry, small and large livestock, handling or arranging butchering, predators and a host of other aspects that they weren’t aware of. Have realistic expectations when planning a move to a rural area. Don’t assume that neighbors who farm will be willing to work for you for free. If they bring their tractor to till your garden offer a reasonable payment for their time and fuel. If they turn it down at least plan on sharing the harvest with them with occasional breads and other treats. An example is a retired farmer who allows someone to hunt on his farm for occasional maintenance help of a few hours here or there. The hunter appreciates it and brings an occasional venison roast or other ‘benefit’ as a thank you. Although it isn’t expected it is a tasty incentive that has made a workable situation into a friendship. Research, common sense and a reasonable expectation based on reality goes a long ways towards making a difference in a positive way for your lifestyle rather than disappointment.

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